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Nebrija University
Education
Latest Publications
Book Chapter
Published: 15 June 2024

The relationship between prosodic encliticization of the conjunctive coordinator and OV word order (or the equivalent correlation between VO and procliticization) is a strong descriptive universal. Namely, if a language shows prosodic encliticization (prosodic attachment after the initial coordinand), as in “John-and Peter”, then that language is necessarily OV, as is the case in Japanese. However, if a language has procliticization of the conjunctive coordinator, as in “John and-Peter”, we cannot say whether it is OV or VO, since, for example, English, Spanish and Basque display procliticization but English and Spanish are VO while Basque is OV. Using experimental data from speakers of convergent (OV – enclisis and VO – proclisis) languages such as Japanese, English, and Spanish and non-convergent (OV – proclisis) languages such as Basque, the study addresses the strength of the relationship between the encliticization of conjunctive coordination and word order in the mind of native speakers of these four languages.

ACS Style

Juana M. Liceras; Marco Llamazares; Yoriko Aizu. Chapter 21. Prosody and head directionality. 2024, 556 -584.

AMA Style

Juana M. Liceras, Marco Llamazares, Yoriko Aizu. Chapter 21. Prosody and head directionality. . 2024; ():556-584.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Juana M. Liceras; Marco Llamazares; Yoriko Aizu. 2024. "Chapter 21. Prosody and head directionality." , no. : 556-584.

Book Chapter
Published: 31 May 2024

The main objective of this chapter is to highlight the importance of creating a socio-relational climate based on a discourse and empathic discourse and forms of communication in which respect, closeness, solidarity among other values take precedence, given that, the school community in its richness and relational diversity requires a broad, complex and plural way of sharing socio-relational processes and promoting dialogue and encounter between all members of the educational community. On the other hand, to offer teaching staff some models, methods, and activities to be approached with imagination, empathy, and emotional intelligence. This is to ensure that new and harmonious social relations contribute to the shaping an institutional and classroom climate that enhances appropriate forms and styles of understanding, collaboration and creation of close environments and scenarios that lead to complete satisfaction and balance among all individuals. Request access from your librarian to read this chapter's full text.

ACS Style

Adiela Ruiz-Cabezas; Ana Isabel Holgueras González; María del Castañar Medina Domínguez. Dialogue and Inclusion in Educational Institutions. 2024, 116 -133.

AMA Style

Adiela Ruiz-Cabezas, Ana Isabel Holgueras González, María del Castañar Medina Domínguez. Dialogue and Inclusion in Educational Institutions. . 2024; ():116-133.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Adiela Ruiz-Cabezas; Ana Isabel Holgueras González; María del Castañar Medina Domínguez. 2024. "Dialogue and Inclusion in Educational Institutions." , no. : 116-133.

Journal Article
Bilingualism: Language and Cognition
Published: 14 May 2024 in Bilingualism: Language and Cognition

Autobiographical memories (AMs) are partly influenced by people's ability to process and express their emotions. This study investigated the extent to which trait emotional intelligence (EI) contributed to the emotional vocabulary of 148 adolescents – 60 speakers of Spanish as a heritage language (HL) raised in Germany, 61 first-language (L1) German speakers and 27 L1 Spanish speakers – in their written AMs of anger and surprise. The results revealed that heritage speakers with high trait EI used more emotional words in their AMs. These bilinguals also used more positive, negative and high-arousal words in their HL and in their AMs of anger. Similar patterns were observed in the AMs produced in Spanish (HL and L1), but L1 Spanish speakers used more emotional words in their AMs of surprise. By contrast, L1 German speakers used more emotional words than bilinguals in their AMs in German, and AMs of anger in German included more emotional vocabulary than those addressing surprise events.

ACS Style

Carmen Vidal Noguera; Irini Mavrou. The “emotional brain” of adolescent Spanish–German heritage speakers: is emotional intelligence a proxy for productive emotional vocabulary? Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 2024, 1 -15.

AMA Style

Carmen Vidal Noguera, Irini Mavrou. The “emotional brain” of adolescent Spanish–German heritage speakers: is emotional intelligence a proxy for productive emotional vocabulary? Bilingualism: Language and Cognition. 2024; ():1-15.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Carmen Vidal Noguera; Irini Mavrou. 2024. "The “emotional brain” of adolescent Spanish–German heritage speakers: is emotional intelligence a proxy for productive emotional vocabulary?" Bilingualism: Language and Cognition , no. : 1-15.

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